History of the GUI Notes

View Power Point | Piemerica Downloads

Intro

 The History of the GUI

 Featuring Windows

 Menus

 Icons

 And Pointers

 With an all star cast

Keyboard

 Typewriters date back to the 1820.

 The QWERTY layout we use on keyboards today was established by Sholes & Glidden in 1874

 A few key technological developments created the transition of the typewriter into the computer keyboard. The teletype machine, 1910, combined the technology of the typewriter (used as an input and a printing device) with the telegraph. These devices eventually formed huge networks worldwide which were eventually phased out by the internet.

 Punchcards- punched card systems were combined with typewriters to create what was called keypunches. Keypunches were the basis of early adding machines and IBM was selling over one million dollars worth of adding machines in 1931. 

 Binac- In 1948, the Binac computer used an electromechanically controlled typewriter to both input data directly onto magnetic tape (for feeding the computer data) and to print results. The emerging electric typewriter further improved the technological marriage between the typewriter and the computer. 

 In 1956 at MIT, researchers began experimentation on direct keyboard input on computers, a precursor to today’s normal mode of operation. Doug Ross wrote a memo advocating direct access in February 1956; five months later (July 1956), the Whirlwind aided in such an experiment. 

Whirlwind

 This was the first digital computer capable of displaying real time text and graphics on a video terminal, which at this time was a large oscilloscope screen. 

 Whirlwind received positional data related to an aircraft from a radar station in Massachusetts. The Whirlwind programmers had created a series of data points, displayed on the screen, that represented the eastern coast of Massachusetts, and when data was received from radar, a symbol representing the aircraft was superimposed over the geographic drawing on the screen of a CRT. 

 The last of the Whirlwind-based SAGE computers was shut down in 1983, giving the Whirlwind a record for practical operational longevity among digital computers. 

SAGE Project

 SAGE — Semi-Automatic Ground Environment — linked hundreds of radar stations in the United States and Canada in the first large-scale computer communications network. An operator directed actions by touching a light gun to the screen.

 Robert Everett designed an input device, which was called a light gun or light pen, to give the operators a way of requesting identification information about the aircraft. When the light gun was pointed at the symbol for the plane on the screen, an event was sent to Whirlwind, which then sent text about the plane's identification, speed and direction to also be displayed on the screen 

 The SAGE computers then collected the tracking data for display on a CRT as icons.

 Operators at the center could select any of the "targets" on the display with a light gun, and then display additional information about the tracking data reported by the radar stations. Up to 150 operators could be supported from each center.

PDP-1

 PDP-1 is the first commercial computer equipped with a keyboard and monitor. PDP stands for Program, Data, Processor. 

Sketchpad 1

 Sketchpad treated the computer screen as a window in which the user could move around freely

 It represented a variety of user programs as images or objects on the screen, which could be selected with a lightpen

 A light pen provided the coordinates corresponding to the drawing commands entered on the keyboard. 

Sketchpad 2

 Highly precise drawings could be created, manipulated, duplicated, and stored.

 Could split it screen horizontally into two independent sections. One section could, for example, give a close-up view of the object in the other section. 

 The software provided a scale of 2000:1, offering large areas of drawing space. 

 The light pen allowed editing existing drawing entities.

 Many of the computer’s switches were assigned functions, such as move and draw. Sketchpad was a complete and working CAD software package.

Rand Tablet

 When a stylus was touched to the surface of the tablet, it picked up pulses capacitively from the closest of the horizontal and vertical conductors which was converted into an (x,y) coordinate value.

NLS 1

 NLS: The oNLine System

 [On December 9, 1968, an astounding technology demonstration happened at the Convention Center in San Francisco during the Fall Joint Computer Conference (FJCC). Douglas Engelbart and his team of 17 colleagues working in the Augmentation Research Center at the Stanford Research Institute (SRI) in Menlo Park, California, presented NLS (oNLine System), an "online" system they had been creating since 1962]

 Windows
The computer screen could be split into a frozen display and a scanning window. Thus, while you were reading a manual, say, and you needed to look up a term, you could split the screen and view the term's definition in the dynamically changing scanning window, rather like modern day frames in web pages.

 There was no obvious way to indicate boundaries between the windows (such as window borders, title bars, etc) 

NLS 2

 Document Processing

 Engelbart showed that text could be entered, dragged, copied and pasted, formatted, scrolled, grouped hierarchically in multiple nested levels (for example, multiple line of text could be collapsed into a single line), and so on. 

 The system was useful while editing code as well: blocks of code could be expanded and collapsed, with support for auto-completion. 

 Vector-based NLS which could only display text and straight lines

 The text so created could be saved in files, with provision for storing meta-data such as the file's owner, time of creation, and so forth

NLS 3

 Here we see an example of hierarchical grouping
(for example, multiple lines of text could be collapsed into a single line)

 We also see the mouse pointer

NLS 4

 Using text with hyperlinks, Engelbart could jump from one location to another. This could happen either as a result of searching or by use of live hyperlinks that could be visible or invisible.

 The system also had picture drawing capabilities, and even pictures could have live hyperlinks (similar to the imagemaps as we have today). 

 The system provided powerful search facilities where keywords could be weighted, and search results were ordered accordingly. The results could also be presented as hyperlinks. 

 Collaboration

 The system kept track of who you were and what you were doing. People could work collaboratively on files, annotate each other's text, and leave notes for each other, similar in some respect to modern-day document versioning systems. 

 For example, two people could look at the same display, but one of them would only have read-only privileges.

 It was also possible to leave message for one or more specific people

Interactive Collaboration

 The SRI team demonstrated live audio-video conferencing. The communicating parties could even have collaborative screen sharing with independent capabilities. 

AMBIT/G 1

 AMBIT/G employed iconic representations, gesture recognition, dynamic menus with items selected using a pointing device, and selection of icons by pointing

 As the background we see a screenshot of the AMBIT/G system

 Created by Paul Rovner & Inspired Alan Kay

AMBIT/G 2

 Here we see the AMBIT/G system running on a TX-2 computer and using a Tablet for input

Alto

 The Alto was the first system to pull together all of the elements of the modern Graphical User Interface.

 The Alto was designed and built by Xerox for research and, although Xerox donated a number of them to various organizations, they were never sold. 

 Shown to the right is the Alto file manager. Named the "Neptune Directory Editor." It uses the mouse, graphical buttons, and file lists, but no icons or pictures. 

 The use of the mouse buttons for file management operations: "Select file names with the mouse. Red-Copy, Yel-Copy/Rename, Blue-Delete.

Smalltalk

 Smalltalk was an object oriented program language developed at Xerox and used on Altos in the 70s

 Smalltalk provided its own GUI environment that included pop-up menus, windows, and images later referred to as icons. 

 The development environment of Smalltalk was also the user interface that Smalltalk programs ran in, and introduced many modern GUI concepts. 

 Individual windows in Smalltalk were contained by a graphical border, and stood out against the grey pattern of the background below them. They each had a title bar on the top line of each window which could be used to identify the window and move it around the screen. Similar to BeOS mentioned later, the title bar did not stretch the full length of the window, but started at the top left and only extended as far as the title itself. Windows could overlap other windows on the screen, and a selected window would move itself to the top of the "stack. “

 The concept of "icons" was also invented at this time — small iconic representations of programs or documents that could be clicked on to run them or manipulate them.

 Popup menus were also invented at the same time — the user would click one of the mouse buttons and hierarchical, graphical menus based on the task at hand would appear at the last position of the mouse cursor. Also appearing for the first time were scroll bars, radio buttons and dialog boxes.

 The Cedar Window Manager shown here, was the first major tiled window manager

Bravo

 The following are some programs made with Smalltalk that ran on Altos

 This is Bravo, the original "what you see is what you get" document editor. Bravo features a variety of fonts and text formatting options. 

 Bravo was succeeded by Gypsy in which the mouse was used to initiate commands rather than marking locations in the text, as well as selecting areas of the text as was done in Bravo

 Gypsy introduced cut-and-paste editing 

Draw

 This is Draw, another Alto application.

 Unlike a typical paint program, in Draw objects are defined and can then be manipulated individually.

 I managed to get my hands on an Alto and paint my initials in the Draw program.

PERQ 1

 One of the founders, Brian Rosen, had worked at Xerox PARC on the Dolphin. The system was a direct descendant of the original workstation, the Xerox Alto. 

PERQ 2

 The Perq design featured the same style of portrait-mode high resolution display as the Alto.

 It was quite a powerful machine for its time, using a microcoded bit-slice processor with a dedicated BitBlt instruction, and some Perqs remained in use as late as 2001.

Star

 The goal of the Star was to design a new system that incorporated the best features of the Alto, was easy to use, and could automate many office tasks. 

Lisa 1

 Apple negotiated a deal with Xerox; in return for a block of Apple stock, Xerox allowed Jobs and his team to tour PARC in December 1979, take notes, and implement some of the ideas and concepts being bounced around at PARC in their own creations.

 The Lisa interface was the first to have the idea that icons could represent all files in the filesystem 

Lisa 2

 It was voted upon by Apple through research that a one button mouse was optimal for simple usage. The Lisa interface still required at least two actions for each icon (selecting and running) so the concept of double-clicking was invented to provide this functionality. 

 The icons at the desktop feature first-ever trashcan, control panel, clipboard and external hard disk.

 All icons, buttons and GUI elements in Apple Lisa Office System are glyphs in special system fonts, and are drawn internally just like regular text.

Lisa 3

 Redraw portions of obscured windows when a topmost window was moved: this was called "regions”

 During shutdown Lisa saves the entire state of desktop (including open windows), in order to restore it when turned on again.

Visi On 1

 Created by VisiCorp the company who created the killer app. VisiCalc

 Did not use icons at all, requiring the user to click on text labels to start programs or work with documents.

Visi On 2

 I was fully mouse-driven, used a bit-mapped display for both text and graphics, included on-line help, and allowed the user to open a number of programs at once, each in its own window.

 VisiOn did not, however, include a graphical file manager.

 Used Fixed width fonts unlike the Alto, Star, Lisa and Macintosh which used proportionally-spaced fonts 

 Failed due to the lack of popular software written to run under it.

Macintosh

 Lasso multiple icons meaning clicking and dragging a box around multiple icons to select them for moving and so forth.

Windows 1.x

 Microsoft's early partnership developing applications with Apple allowed them access to the Mac OS

 The initially announced version of Windows had features so much resembling Macintosh interface that Microsoft had to change many of them such as overlapping windows 

 Microsoft signed a licensing agreement with Apple that stated Microsoft would not employ Apple technology in Windows 1.0, but made no such agreement for further versions of Windows.

 Although instead of a single menu bar as on the Lisa and Macintosh, each application had its own menu bar attached to it, just below the title bar. 

 Note the icons at the bottom of the screen. This is a special program icon area that is reserved for minimized programs. Double clicking one will display the program's window. Program icons can not be moved from this special icon area, nor can windows cover this area unless one is running in "zoomed" mode. 

X Window System

 The initial design goal of the X Window System (which was invented at MIT in 1984) was merely to provide the framework for displaying multiple command shells and a clock on a single large workstation monitor.

 The X-server program is the program responsible for taking drawing requests from programs on the local or remote computer, talking to the video display, and returning information to the program from the mouse or keyboard. 

 Additionally, the X-server requires a separate program called the window manager that handles window controls such as the title bar, minimize or maximize buttons, controlling the resizing and moving of windows, and providing methods of launching applications. 

 Another layer was created on top of that, called a "desktop environment" or DE, and varied depending on the Unix vendor, so that Sun's interface would look different from SGI's.

 While X was a well-written and easily handled OS shell, it never settled on a particular “look and feel,” and as a result at least three different interfaces, or “windows managers,” floated around for it. 

 X also introduced a new GUI idea where merely moving the mouse cursor over a window would automatically activate it and allow the user to start typing in it.

 X-driven interfaces are popping up in such non-PC devices as TiVo, Web pads, and PDAs

Intro

 The History of the GUI

 Featuring Windows

 Menus

 Icons

 And Pointers

 With an all star cast

Keyboard

 Typewriters date back to the 1820.

 The QWERTY layout we use on keyboards today was established by Sholes & Glidden in 1874

 A few key technological developments created the transition of the typewriter into the computer keyboard. The teletype machine, 1910, combined the technology of the typewriter (used as an input and a printing device) with the telegraph. These devices eventually formed huge networks worldwide which were eventually phased out by the internet.

 Punchcards- punched card systems were combined with typewriters to create what was called keypunches. Keypunches were the basis of early adding machines and IBM was selling over one million dollars worth of adding machines in 1931. 

 Binac- In 1948, the Binac computer used an electromechanically controlled typewriter to both input data directly onto magnetic tape (for feeding the computer data) and to print results. The emerging electric typewriter further improved the technological marriage between the typewriter and the computer. 

 In 1956 at MIT, researchers began experimentation on direct keyboard input on computers, a precursor to today’s normal mode of operation. Doug Ross wrote a memo advocating direct access in February 1956; five months later (July 1956), the Whirlwind aided in such an experiment. 

Whirlwind

 This was the first digital computer capable of displaying real time text and graphics on a video terminal, which at this time was a large oscilloscope screen. 

 Whirlwind received positional data related to an aircraft from a radar station in Massachusetts. The Whirlwind programmers had created a series of data points, displayed on the screen, that represented the eastern coast of Massachusetts, and when data was received from radar, a symbol representing the aircraft was superimposed over the geographic drawing on the screen of a CRT. 

 The last of the Whirlwind-based SAGE computers was shut down in 1983, giving the Whirlwind a record for practical operational longevity among digital computers. 

SAGE Project

 SAGE — Semi-Automatic Ground Environment — linked hundreds of radar stations in the United States and Canada in the first large-scale computer communications network. An operator directed actions by touching a light gun to the screen.

 Robert Everett designed an input device, which was called a light gun or light pen, to give the operators a way of requesting identification information about the aircraft. When the light gun was pointed at the symbol for the plane on the screen, an event was sent to Whirlwind, which then sent text about the plane's identification, speed and direction to also be displayed on the screen 

 The SAGE computers then collected the tracking data for display on a CRT as icons.

 Operators at the center could select any of the "targets" on the display with a light gun, and then display additional information about the tracking data reported by the radar stations. Up to 150 operators could be supported from each center.

PDP-1

 PDP-1 is the first commercial computer equipped with a keyboard and monitor. PDP stands for Program, Data, Processor. 

Sketchpad 1

 Sketchpad treated the computer screen as a window in which the user could move around freely

 It represented a variety of user programs as images or objects on the screen, which could be selected with a lightpen

 A light pen provided the coordinates corresponding to the drawing commands entered on the keyboard. 

Sketchpad 2

 Highly precise drawings could be created, manipulated, duplicated, and stored.

 Could split it screen horizontally into two independent sections. One section could, for example, give a close-up view of the object in the other section. 

 The software provided a scale of 2000:1, offering large areas of drawing space. 

 The light pen allowed editing existing drawing entities.

 Many of the computer’s switches were assigned functions, such as move and draw. Sketchpad was a complete and working CAD software package.

Rand Tablet

 When a stylus was touched to the surface of the tablet, it picked up pulses capacitively from the closest of the horizontal and vertical conductors which was converted into an (x,y) coordinate value.

NLS 1

 NLS: The oNLine System

 [On December 9, 1968, an astounding technology demonstration happened at the Convention Center in San Francisco during the Fall Joint Computer Conference (FJCC). Douglas Engelbart and his team of 17 colleagues working in the Augmentation Research Center at the Stanford Research Institute (SRI) in Menlo Park, California, presented NLS (oNLine System), an "online" system they had been creating since 1962]

 Windows
The computer screen could be split into a frozen display and a scanning window. Thus, while you were reading a manual, say, and you needed to look up a term, you could split the screen and view the term's definition in the dynamically changing scanning window, rather like modern day frames in web pages.

 There was no obvious way to indicate boundaries between the windows (such as window borders, title bars, etc) 

NLS 2

 Document Processing

 Engelbart showed that text could be entered, dragged, copied and pasted, formatted, scrolled, grouped hierarchically in multiple nested levels (for example, multiple line of text could be collapsed into a single line), and so on. 

 The system was useful while editing code as well: blocks of code could be expanded and collapsed, with support for auto-completion. 

 Vector-based NLS which could only display text and straight lines

 The text so created could be saved in files, with provision for storing meta-data such as the file's owner, time of creation, and so forth

NLS 3

 Here we see an example of hierarchical grouping
(for example, multiple lines of text could be collapsed into a single line)

 We also see the mouse pointer

NLS 4

 Using text with hyperlinks, Engelbart could jump from one location to another. This could happen either as a result of searching or by use of live hyperlinks that could be visible or invisible.

 The system also had picture drawing capabilities, and even pictures could have live hyperlinks (similar to the imagemaps as we have today). 

 The system provided powerful search facilities where keywords could be weighted, and search results were ordered accordingly. The results could also be presented as hyperlinks. 

 Collaboration

 The system kept track of who you were and what you were doing. People could work collaboratively on files, annotate each other's text, and leave notes for each other, similar in some respect to modern-day document versioning systems. 

 For example, two people could look at the same display, but one of them would only have read-only privileges.

 It was also possible to leave message for one or more specific people

Interactive Collaboration

 The SRI team demonstrated live audio-video conferencing. The communicating parties could even have collaborative screen sharing with independent capabilities. 

AMBIT/G 1

 AMBIT/G employed iconic representations, gesture recognition, dynamic menus with items selected using a pointing device, and selection of icons by pointing

 As the background we see a screenshot of the AMBIT/G system

 Created by Paul Rovner & Inspired Alan Kay

AMBIT/G 2

 Here we see the AMBIT/G system running on a TX-2 computer and using a Tablet for input

Alto

 The Alto was the first system to pull together all of the elements of the modern Graphical User Interface.

 The Alto was designed and built by Xerox for research and, although Xerox donated a number of them to various organizations, they were never sold. 

 Shown to the right is the Alto file manager. Named the "Neptune Directory Editor." It uses the mouse, graphical buttons, and file lists, but no icons or pictures. 

 The use of the mouse buttons for file management operations: "Select file names with the mouse. Red-Copy, Yel-Copy/Rename, Blue-Delete.

Smalltalk

 Smalltalk was an object oriented program language developed at Xerox and used on Altos in the 70s

 Smalltalk provided its own GUI environment that included pop-up menus, windows, and images later referred to as icons. 

 The development environment of Smalltalk was also the user interface that Smalltalk programs ran in, and introduced many modern GUI concepts. 

 Individual windows in Smalltalk were contained by a graphical border, and stood out against the grey pattern of the background below them. They each had a title bar on the top line of each window which could be used to identify the window and move it around the screen. Similar to BeOS mentioned later, the title bar did not stretch the full length of the window, but started at the top left and only extended as far as the title itself. Windows could overlap other windows on the screen, and a selected window would move itself to the top of the "stack. “

 The concept of "icons" was also invented at this time — small iconic representations of programs or documents that could be clicked on to run them or manipulate them.

 Popup menus were also invented at the same time — the user would click one of the mouse buttons and hierarchical, graphical menus based on the task at hand would appear at the last position of the mouse cursor. Also appearing for the first time were scroll bars, radio buttons and dialog boxes.

 The Cedar Window Manager shown here, was the first major tiled window manager

Bravo

 The following are some programs made with Smalltalk that ran on Altos

 This is Bravo, the original "what you see is what you get" document editor. Bravo features a variety of fonts and text formatting options. 

 Bravo was succeeded by Gypsy in which the mouse was used to initiate commands rather than marking locations in the text, as well as selecting areas of the text as was done in Bravo

 Gypsy introduced cut-and-paste editing 

Draw

 This is Draw, another Alto application.

 Unlike a typical paint program, in Draw objects are defined and can then be manipulated individually.

 I managed to get my hands on an Alto and paint my initials in the Draw program.

PERQ 1

 One of the founders, Brian Rosen, had worked at Xerox PARC on the Dolphin. The system was a direct descendant of the original workstation, the Xerox Alto. 

PERQ 2

 The Perq design featured the same style of portrait-mode high resolution display as the Alto.

 It was quite a powerful machine for its time, using a microcoded bit-slice processor with a dedicated BitBlt instruction, and some Perqs remained in use as late as 2001.

Star

 The goal of the Star was to design a new system that incorporated the best features of the Alto, was easy to use, and could automate many office tasks. 

Lisa 1

 Apple negotiated a deal with Xerox; in return for a block of Apple stock, Xerox allowed Jobs and his team to tour PARC in December 1979, take notes, and implement some of the ideas and concepts being bounced around at PARC in their own creations.

 The Lisa interface was the first to have the idea that icons could represent all files in the filesystem 

 

 

Lisa 2

 It was voted upon by Apple through research that a one button mouse was optimal for simple usage. The Lisa interface still required at least two actions for each icon (selecting and running) so the concept of double-clicking was invented to provide this functionality. 

 The icons at the desktop feature first-ever trashcan, control panel, clipboard and external hard disk.

 All icons, buttons and GUI elements in Apple Lisa Office System are glyphs in special system fonts, and are drawn internally just like regular text.

Lisa 3

 Redraw portions of obscured windows when a topmost window was moved: this was called "regions”

 During shutdown Lisa saves the entire state of desktop (including open windows), in order to restore it when turned on again.

Visi On 1

 Created by VisiCorp the company who created the killer app. VisiCalc

 Did not use icons at all, requiring the user to click on text labels to start programs or work with documents.

Visi On 2

 I was fully mouse-driven, used a bit-mapped display for both text and graphics, included on-line help, and allowed the user to open a number of programs at once, each in its own window.

 VisiOn did not, however, include a graphical file manager.

 Used Fixed width fonts unlike the Alto, Star, Lisa and Macintosh which used proportionally-spaced fonts 

 Failed due to the lack of popular software written to run under it.

Macintosh

 Lasso multiple icons meaning clicking and dragging a box around multiple icons to select them for moving and so forth.

Windows 1.x

 Microsoft's early partnership developing applications with Apple allowed them access to the Mac OS

 The initially announced version of Windows had features so much resembling Macintosh interface that Microsoft had to change many of them such as overlapping windows 

 Microsoft signed a licensing agreement with Apple that stated Microsoft would not employ Apple technology in Windows 1.0, but made no such agreement for further versions of Windows.

 Although instead of a single menu bar as on the Lisa and Macintosh, each application had its own menu bar attached to it, just below the title bar. 

 Note the icons at the bottom of the screen. This is a special program icon area that is reserved for minimized programs. Double clicking one will display the program's window. Program icons can not be moved from this special icon area, nor can windows cover this area unless one is running in "zoomed" mode. 

X Window System

 The initial design goal of the X Window System (which was invented at MIT in 1984) was merely to provide the framework for displaying multiple command shells and a clock on a single large workstation monitor.

 The X-server program is the program responsible for taking drawing requests from programs on the local or remote computer, talking to the video display, and returning information to the program from the mouse or keyboard. 

 Additionally, the X-server requires a separate program called the window manager that handles window controls such as the title bar, minimize or maximize buttons, controlling the resizing and moving of windows, and providing methods of launching applications. 

 Another layer was created on top of that, called a "desktop environment" or DE, and varied depending on the Unix vendor, so that Sun's interface would look different from SGI's.

 While X was a well-written and easily handled OS shell, it never settled on a particular “look and feel,” and as a result at least three different interfaces, or “windows managers,” floated around for it. 

 X also introduced a new GUI idea where merely moving the mouse cursor over a window would automatically activate it and allow the user to start typing in it.

 X-driven interfaces are popping up in such non-PC devices as TiVo, Web pads, and PDAs

 

 

Amiga Workbench

 It also had a single menu bar at the top that was normally hidden from view and activated using the right mouse button. 

Arthur

 Introduced a new concept: a "Dock" or shelf at the bottom of the screen where shortcuts to launch common programs and tools could be kept.

 The GUI, called "Arthur", also was the first to feature anti-aliased display of on-screen fonts, meaning minimizing jagged or blocky patterns.

Windows 2.x

 Overlapping windows are allowed, and windows may be freely resized and moved on the screen.

 The window controls now consist of a system box in the upper left, and a minimize and maximize or restore button in the upper right if they are applicable to the particular window. 

 In Windows 2.x and 3.x, minimized icons can roam around anywhere on the screen, and can easily be covered by a program window. This made the task bar in Windows 95 look like a revolutionary breakthrough in the way windows are managed. Compared to the icon area of Windows 1.x, the task bar looks only like a modification. 

NeXTSTEP 2

 Had a new idea of a vertical menu strip in the upper left-hand corner, which could also be "torn off" at any point so that the user could leave specific menus at any point on the screen. 

 NeXTSTEP also had a Dock that lived on any side of the screen (default on the right hand side).

 As you can see in the bottom right corner Microsoft possibly got the recycling idea from NeXTSTEP.

OS/2

 OS/2 was a project designed to replace DOS.

 OS/2 1.0 had been text-only, but version 1.1 came with a graphical user interface known as the Presentation Manager. This was visually quite similar to Windows 2.0. 

 OS/2 2.0 also had the ability, thanks to the license agreement with Microsoft, of running a built-in copy of Windows 3.1 in a virtual machine. This allowed the user to run Windows 3.1 applications either full-screen or on a window on the OS/2 desktop

Windows

 Windows reached an unprecedented level of popularity with the release of version 3.0 in 1990 and 3.1 in 1992. While still lacking many of the features of the Macintosh (such as an icon-based file manager) it was sharp and had good looking icons, and sold millions of copies. 

 The release of Windows 95 cemented Microsoft's lead in GUI sales, and became one of the most popular programs of all time. 

Macintosh

 OS 7 –May 1991

 Balloon help lets you know what a menu option does or what an icon is for by displaying a help balloon by every object as the pointer passes over it. 

 The Control Strip is a fast way to change the system volume, control the playback of audio CDs, manage file sharing and printers and change the monitor resolution and color depth

 Allows changing the color of certain icons to represent various categories. 

 OS 8 –July 1997

 The new appearance manager has a built in window blind effect that reduces windows to just a title bar by clicking a button on the right side of the title bar. 

 Folder Windows can be dragged to the bottom of the screen where they appear as tabs that can be pulled out

WorldWideWeb

 A hypertext page has pieces of text which refer to other texts.

 Such references are highlighted and can be selected with a mouse

 When you select a reference, the browser presents you with the text which is referenced thus making the browser follow a hypertext link

 The World Wide Web has influenced other GUI’s due to the familiar interface of the web.

 The World Wide Web is the only thing I know of whose shortened form takes three times longer to say than what it's short for. —Douglas Adams, The Independent on Sunday, 1999

BOB

 Bob is a graphical shell that runs atop of Windows 3.1 or Windows 95

 Bob has what Microsoft labeled a “Social Interface” with Animated guides ever-present giving tips and options

 Bob's idea of animated guides continue in other Microsoft products such as Office Assistants including The Dot who made its first appearance in Bob. The primary Bob guide, Rover also appears in XP as the default search assistant.

 Another thing introduced in Bob is Bullet Listed Balloon Help

 Objects within rooms launch applications

BeOS

 BeOS, introduced as part of the BeBox computer in 1995 and as an operating system for the PC in 1998. 

 Introduced the idea of "Taskbar Grouping" where tasks were sorted by application type, so each document loaded in a word processor could be found in a submenu under that word processor.

 BeOS also added to the idea of the Smalltalk-like title bar by allowing the user to move it left or right along the top of the window, in order for background applications to still be visible. 

OS X

 Released March 2001

 A result of the merger with NeXT and at its core a new version of NeXTSTEP.

 Aqua introduced the idea of a GUI where every window was double-buffered in memory, so that any redraws happen off-screen and aren't visible (try the same "moving a Finder window over a Microsoft Word document" trick in OS X and no matter how fast your eyes are, you won't see a redraw).

 Aqua also introduced several eye-candy features like minimized windows stretching and squeezing into the dock.

 "Sheets" where a dialog box appears to zoom right out of its attached application.

 In Apple's latest version of OSX, a new feature called Expose put a new twist on application switching by growing and shrinking every open application's window in order to fit them all on one screen. 

 

Amiga Workbench

 It also had a single menu bar at the top that was normally hidden from view and activated using the right mouse button. 

Arthur

 Introduced a new concept: a "Dock" or shelf at the bottom of the screen where shortcuts to launch common programs and tools could be kept.

 The GUI, called "Arthur", also was the first to feature anti-aliased display of on-screen fonts, meaning minimizing jagged or blocky patterns.

Windows 2.x

 Overlapping windows are allowed, and windows may be freely resized and moved on the screen.

 The window controls now consist of a system box in the upper left, and a minimize and maximize or restore button in the upper right if they are applicable to the particular window. 

 In Windows 2.x and 3.x, minimized icons can roam around anywhere on the screen, and can easily be covered by a program window. This made the task bar in Windows 95 look like a revolutionary breakthrough in the way windows are managed. Compared to the icon area of Windows 1.x, the task bar looks only like a modification. 

NeXTSTEP 2

 Had a new idea of a vertical menu strip in the upper left-hand corner, which could also be "torn off" at any point so that the user could leave specific menus at any point on the screen. 

 NeXTSTEP also had a Dock that lived on any side of the screen (default on the right hand side).

 As you can see in the bottom right corner Microsoft possibly got the recycling idea from NeXTSTEP.

OS/2

 OS/2 was a project designed to replace DOS.

 OS/2 1.0 had been text-only, but version 1.1 came with a graphical user interface known as the Presentation Manager. This was visually quite similar to Windows 2.0. 

 OS/2 2.0 also had the ability, thanks to the license agreement with Microsoft, of running a built-in copy of Windows 3.1 in a virtual machine. This allowed the user to run Windows 3.1 applications either full-screen or on a window on the OS/2 desktop

Windows

 Windows reached an unprecedented level of popularity with the release of version 3.0 in 1990 and 3.1 in 1992. While still lacking many of the features of the Macintosh (such as an icon-based file manager) it was sharp and had good looking icons, and sold millions of copies. 

 The release of Windows 95 cemented Microsoft's lead in GUI sales, and became one of the most popular programs of all time. 

Macintosh

 OS 7 –May 1991

 Balloon help lets you know what a menu option does or what an icon is for by displaying a help balloon by every object as the pointer passes over it. 

 The Control Strip is a fast way to change the system volume, control the playback of audio CDs, manage file sharing and printers and change the monitor resolution and color depth

 Allows changing the color of certain icons to represent various categories. 

 OS 8 –July 1997

 The new appearance manager has a built in window blind effect that reduces windows to just a title bar by clicking a button on the right side of the title bar. 

 Folder Windows can be dragged to the bottom of the screen where they appear as tabs that can be pulled out

WorldWideWeb

 A hypertext page has pieces of text which refer to other texts.

 Such references are highlighted and can be selected with a mouse

 When you select a reference, the browser presents you with the text which is referenced thus making the browser follow a hypertext link

 The World Wide Web has influenced other GUI’s due to the familiar interface of the web.

 The World Wide Web is the only thing I know of whose shortened form takes three times longer to say than what it's short for. —Douglas Adams, The Independent on Sunday, 1999

BOB

 Bob is a graphical shell that runs atop of Windows 3.1 or Windows 95

 Bob has what Microsoft labeled a “Social Interface” with Animated guides ever-present giving tips and options

 Bob's idea of animated guides continue in other Microsoft products such as Office Assistants including The Dot who made its first appearance in Bob. The primary Bob guide, Rover also appears in XP as the default search assistant.

 Another thing introduced in Bob is Bullet Listed Balloon Help

 Objects within rooms launch applications

BeOS

 BeOS, introduced as part of the BeBox computer in 1995 and as an operating system for the PC in 1998. 

 Introduced the idea of "Taskbar Grouping" where tasks were sorted by application type, so each document loaded in a word processor could be found in a submenu under that word processor.

 BeOS also added to the idea of the Smalltalk-like title bar by allowing the user to move it left or right along the top of the window, in order for background applications to still be visible. 

OS X

 Released March 2001

 A result of the merger with NeXT and at its core a new version of NeXTSTEP.

 Aqua introduced the idea of a GUI where every window was double-buffered in memory, so that any redraws happen off-screen and aren't visible (try the same "moving a Finder window over a Microsoft Word document" trick in OS X and no matter how fast your eyes are, you won't see a redraw).

 Aqua also introduced several eye-candy features like minimized windows stretching and squeezing into the dock.

 "Sheets" where a dialog box appears to zoom right out of its attached application.

 In Apple's latest version of OSX, a new feature called Expose put a new twist on application switching by growing and shrinking every open application's window in order to fit them all on one screen.